Pressure washing is a multi million dollar industry in today's residential and commercial world. A pressure washing business requires a relatively small investment as far as equipment is concerned. Pressure washing businesses have become quite lucrative in recent years. They provide pressure washing for a variety of clients, including residential and those in industrial, construction and transportation services. Because they constantly have to go to places of business and residential areas, most power washing businesses are mobile. However, there are some that operate out of a commercial location, and these typically only do pressure washing for vehicles and other small items that can be brought to the pressure washing business.

Get Started

Conduct a survey to help you generate business ideas. Research existing competition in your area. Start at nearby residential areas and assess the situation in what areas is pressure washer needed. Determine the services that you want to offer. Your equipment and labor needs will be directly related to the services you want to provide. Establish your rates by calculating your cost of providing the service in your area.

Choose between commercial or residential markets for your pressure washing business services. Although the residential market is larger, there is more competition for smaller jobs and from do-it-yourself homeowners. Some pressure washing businesses are franchised while others are started from scratch.

Enroll in a pressure washer course if there is available in your area. Pressure washers using the incorrect water pressure can damage wood and siding. A course that teaches you how to avoid damaging a client's property is well worth the investment. Being able to restore wood and ensuring that you are compliant with federal environmental rules, will set you above other contractors in your area.

Next is to purchase the right equipment and vehicles that you need. Review the requirements by visiting the equipment reviews from various pressure washer websites. Generally, you may consider gas powered over the electric, since you won't always have easy access to outlets. If you can afford a trailer-mounted pressure washer, go for it because it will have a large capacity and can be pulled by your truck reducing the wear and tear within the bed of your truck.

For the best results, choose a gasoline-powered or hot-water pressure washer of at least 3,000 to 4,000 PSI. High pressure hoses, a water tank, a variety of detergents and cleaners and an assortment of tips should set you up for most jobs. Practice on your own home and driveway before heading out to perform work for customers. Buy liability insurance before your first job in case you inadvertently damage any property.

Other things to consider are the PSI (pounds per square inch) rating, GPM (gallons per minute) whether you can use hot water. Hot water may allow you to use a lower PSI, making it better suited for certain materials. Your PSI should be at least 2,000, but no more than about 5,000. Other supplies include hoses, chemicals and an X-Jet nozzle.

Monitor Sales and Management

Set Up your own accounting system. Find samples that you can use to track your accounts payable (bills), your accounts receivables (invoices) and your cash on hand from websites. Then evaluate your expenses and write up a price list that will allow you to make a profit.

Consider the time you anticipate you will need to invest with each job, the materials you'll use, and how much you'll charge based on what other pressure cleaners in your area are charging. Your price list may need to be adjusted once you've completed a variety of jobs. Revise your business plan and marketing plan as needed. Develop an inventory monitoring plan. Weather contingency plans and temporary staffing plans may also be required to meet seasonal demands.

How to Market

Join  associations and local chamber of commerce to stay abreast of industry development, sub-contract and bid opportunities and word of mouth referrals. Review your goals and strategies frequently. Get supplier contracts or lines of credit so that you have ready access to the inventory needed to operate.

Check environmental protection laws that affect your business. Some communities also have noise laws that may restrict your service hours. Contact government buildings and schools to get their business. Register your business in the Chamber of Commerce. Post flyers on bulletin boards at home improvement store.